Gene

GENE is an eCommerce agency helping merchants out-think and outmanoeuvre their competitors. As a specialist Magento agency we find new ways to grow online eCommerce businesses through hands-on consultancy backed up with the technical know-how to get things done.

Your Magento eCommerce Experts

GENE is the team behind the official Braintree extension for Magento which includes integrations with PayPal, PayPal Credit, Apple Pay and Google Pay. GENE is also the team that developed BlueFootCMS, the page-builder technology acquired by Magento.

TEAMS WE’VE HELPED

Heritage

Temple Spa

Hart of Stur

Green People

Grostore

Hornby

Incontinence Choice

Drench

Model Space

Discovering Better

Gene

Your Magento eCommerce Specialists

Initiative Involvement Q&A

Can you tell us a bit about GENE?

GENE is a specialist Magento eCommerce agency. We are primarily involved in helping our clients grow their online businesses through strategy, design, development, integrations and support. Alongside this, we also develop software for the Magento ecosystem and are responsible for the Braintree extensions for Magento including Apple Pay and Google Pagee and also the Content Management System BlueFootCMS that was acquired by Magento. We have a particular interest in addressing the challenge faced by merchants on mobile conversion and are actively looking at ways and techniques of solving this whether that be technology, speed, performance or user experience.

Can you tell us about the merchants you work with in the Initiative?

All the clients we spoke to were actively seeking ways to improve their mobile conversion. Of the clients that engaged the majority were experiencing over 60% of their website traffic on mobile devices and had a commercial need to ensure the were maximising the eCommerce opportunities on mobile. On particular client within the automotive parts and spare business recognised that many of their customers were mechanics out in workshops without access all the time to a desktop – providing a more optimised solution on a mobile made sense.

What are some of the challenges you or your clients have encountered with mobile conversions?

Mobile visitors are on the increase, without exception all of our clients experience website traffic that is now over 50% on a mobile device, some clients it is as much as 80%. The trends indicate that this is only going to increase. The challenge is that mobile eCommerce conversion is significantly lower than that on a desktop. Whilst we see the online revenue on mobile increase it is not keeping pace with the rate of change of visitor numbers.

Any interesting results you have found with mobile conversions?

I’m always surprised at how much the tiny and perceived insignificant changes can have for instance adding a security lock icon to the checkout or removing the header links from the checkout. This demonstrates that rarely is there a silver bullet solution but more that lots of small changes can have a big impact.

Were there any tests that didn’t work that surprised you?

Not really, some provided more of an uplift than others and we saw different results for different customers which proved that not everyone is the same and merchants need to adapt to their own customer behaviour.

Why should merchants invest in data driven testing and optimization?

The industry moves at such a pace from user behaviour to technology. The whole industry is learning and merchants need to be basing decisions on what is currently happening and adapting to that change. The best way to track and respond to this is using the vast amounts of data that exist, but also choosing tools that allow them to understand and interpret that data.

What are some of the advanced things you want to test next?

There has always been an ongoing discussion in the industry around 1-page checkout vs multi-step checkouts I’d be interested to see a wide-ranging study on this. Also with the increased adoption of mobile payment wallets such as Apple Pay and Google Pay I’m interested in seeing the impact of those on mobile conversion.

What were some assumptions or reservations your clients had going into the study?

The main reservation our clients had was, will the tests have a negative impact on our conversion and will the analytics software conflict with our site. This was not the case, there were no instances of conflict and clients only experienced positive outcomes.

What kind of expectations did your clients have going into testing?

Few had any expectations other than an excitement to see what if anything they were missing. Sometimes there is a hope that a study like this will provide one obvious answer but more times than most it is making small optimisation recommendations.

Have the results exceeded/met/not met your clients’ expectation?

For some it has reinforced strategies and ideas and has accelerated the need to implement them. PayPal Checkout placement has also encouraged merchants to realize the need to have this further up the buying steps.

How should a merchant define success for optimization? Conversion rate, AOV, RPV?

For us on a purely optimisation basis in the checkout we would look at conversion rate impact.

We have seen merchants jump in with basic split A/B testing in the past without a clear idea of what specifically they are testing. Our recommendations are also to keep the tests simple and precise and ensure that enough data over a long enough period.

Your Magento eCommerce Specialists

Initiative Involvement Q&A

Can you tell us a bit about GENE?

GENE is a specialist Magento eCommerce agency. We are primarily involved in helping our clients grow their online businesses through strategy, design, development, integrations and support. Alongside this, we also develop software for the Magento ecosystem and are responsible for the Braintree extensions for Magento including Apple Pay and Google Pagee and also the Content Management System BlueFootCMS that was acquired by Magento. We have a particular interest in addressing the challenge faced by merchants on mobile conversion and are actively looking at ways and techniques of solving this whether that be technology, speed, performance or user experience.

Can you tell us about the merchants you work with in the Initiative?

All the clients we spoke to were actively seeking ways to improve their mobile conversion. Of the clients that engaged the majority were experiencing over 60% of their website traffic on mobile devices and had a commercial need to ensure the were maximising the opportunities on mobile. On particular client within the automotive parts and spare business recognised that many of their customers were mechanics out in workshops without access all the time to a desktop – providing a more optimised solution on a mobile made sense.

What are some of the challenges you or your clients have encountered with mobile conversions?

Mobile visitors are on the increase, without exception all of our clients experience website traffic that is now over 50% on a mobile device, some clients it is as much as 80%. The trends indicate that this is only going to increase. The challenge is that mobile conversion is significantly lower than that on a desktop. Whilst we see the online revenue on mobile increase it is not keeping pace with the rate of change of visitor numbers.

Any interesting results you have found with mobile conversions?

I’m always surprised at how much the tiny and perceived insignificant changes can have for instance adding a security lock icon to the checkout or removing the header links from the checkout. This demonstrates that rarely is there a silver bullet solution but more that lots of small changes can have a big impact.

Were there any tests that didn’t work that surprised you?

Not really, some provided more of an uplift than others and we saw different results for different customers which proved that not everyone is the same and merchants need to adapt to their own customer behaviour.

Why should merchants invest in data driven testing and optimization?

The industry moves at such a pace from user behaviour to technology. The whole industry is learning and merchants need to be basing decisions on what is currently happening and adapting to that change. The best way to track and respond to this is using the vast amounts of data that exist, but also choosing tools that allow them to understand and interpret that data.

What are some of the advanced things you want to test next?

There has always been an ongoing discussion in the industry around 1-page checkout vs multi-step checkouts I’d be interested to see a wide-ranging study on this. Also with the increased adoption of mobile payment wallets such as Apple Pay and Google Pay I’m interested in seeing the impact of those on mobile conversion.

What were some assumptions or reservations your clients had going into the study?

The main reservation our clients had was, will the tests have a negative impact on our conversion and will the analytics software conflict with our site. This was not the case, there were no instances of conflict and clients only experienced positive outcomes.

What kind of expectations did your clients have going into testing?

Few had any expectations other than an excitement to see what if anything they were missing. Sometimes there is a hope that a study like this will provide one obvious answer but more times than most it is making small optimisation recommendations.

Have the results exceeded/met/not met your clients’ expectation?

For some it has reinforced strategies and ideas and has accelerated the need to implement them. PayPal Checkout placement has also encouraged merchants to realize the need to have this further up the buying steps.

How should a merchant define success for optimization? Conversion rate, AOV, RPV?

For us on a purely optimisation basis in the checkout we would look at conversion rate impact.

We have seen merchants jump in with basic split A/B testing in the past without a clear idea of what specifically they are testing. Our recommendations are also to keep the tests simple and precise and ensure that enough data over a long enough period.